Clinical Research Trials

Patients who participate in clinical trials are given a medication to treat their specific condition and they are followed very closely to evaluate its effectiveness and safety.

UNDERSTANDING CLINICAL TRIALS

What is a clinical trial?

Doctors use different medicines to treat patients with specific diseases or illnesses to help treat or cure their conditions. Before any of these medicines can be prescribed by a physician, the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires strict testing to be sure they are safe and effective at treating a particular disease or illness. This testing is done by conducting clinical trials.

A clinical trial is process by where new treatments are tested on volunteers by physicians and other medical professionals. These trials take place only after some initial testing has been done to show that the treatment has some potential to be effective against treating a specific disease or illness and that it is relatively safe. Patients who participate in clinical trials are given a medication to treat their specific condition and they are followed very closely to evaluate its effectiveness and safety. For more information about our clinical trials team, see our About Us page.

Why should I participate in a clinical trial?

It is important for new treatments to be tested on people they are meant to help. This includes the trials being conducted on people of different ages, genders and races because people may respond differently to the treatments.

Clinical trials are also a way for patients to access new and, potentially, more effective medicines before they become available to the general public. They may also provide another option when standard therapy has failed.

Patients can also receive free treatment for many clinical trials, including the medicine being evaluated, doctor visits, physical examinations, laboratory tests, and other tests. Participating in clinical trials is also an opportunity to help advance medical knowledge and enable doctors to expand treatments for particular medical conditions. To get started with a clinical trial, complete our medical research trials patient enrollment form.

Are there any risks to participating in clinical trials?

There are some possible risks to participating in clinical trials. One risk is that some patients may receive placebos (inactive ingredients sometimes referred to as “sugar pills”) during the study. This means every participant will not receive active medication which could lead to a worsening condition. Also some patients could experience side effects from the study medication. Although any medicine can cause side effects, participants in clinical trials are monitored very closely during their participation for any potential problems. It is important to remember that patients can leave a study at any time, for any reason. These include intolerable side effects, or if their condition worsens or is not improving. Complete our medical research trials patient enrollment form to get started with a clinical trial.

How will I know if I can participate in a particular trial?

In order to participate in a clinical trial you must first have the specific disease or illness that is being tested. Each clinical trial also has specific requirements that patients must meet before they can participate. These requirements may include information about age, gender, past medical history and medications that you have taken in the past or that you are currently taking. This criteria is specific for each clinical trial. Questions for our clinical trials team? Contact Us.

What happens during a clinical trial?

Clinical trials are conducted according to a plan called a protocol. The protocol describes what types of patients may enter the study, schedules of tests and procedures, drugs, dosages, and length of study, as well as the outcomes that will be measured. Each person participating in the study must agree to the rules set out by the protocol.

The clinical trial team includes doctors and nurses as well as social workers and other health care professionals. They check the health of the participant at the beginning of the trial, give specific instructions for participating in the trial, monitor the participant carefully during the trial, and stay in touch after the trial is completed.

Some clinical trials involve more tests and doctor visits than the participant would normally have for an illness or condition. For all types of trials, the participant works with a research team. Clinical trial participation is most successful when the protocol is carefully followed and there is frequent contact with the research staff. For more information about our clinical trials team, see our About Us page.

 
INNOVATIVE CLINICAL RESEARCH

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